HubSpot: Creating a Company You Love

Improving Company Culture With Foosball

Photo courtesy of Flickr user @robscomputer

If there is one thing that separates the new generation from previous generations, it is that people are no longer willing to settle. Gone are the days when we would fall into a career and stick with it for the promise of stable paychecks. Money is not the top priority anymore. Now, what matters is that we find meaning in what we do, and that we love what we do.

In order to love what you do, you must appreciate the environment you are working in, as well as the people you are working with. This can be attained through working for a company that has the kind of company culture you are looking to be a part of.

HubSpot, pioneers in inbound marketing who help customers make marketing people love, describes in a recent presentation, how they built their culture and why it works for them and their employees.

Here are the crib notes of HubSpot’s 155 slide presentation on their Company Culture [link to the original presentation]:

“A great culture helps attract great people.”

A “culture” is a “set of shared beliefs, values and practices”. Not only do people want to be part of a great culture that aligns with their beliefs and values, but a company wants to create a great culture in order to attract the kind of people they want working for them. They don’t want people who just have a lot of skills or experience, but people who help further the company by sharing the same passion towards their goals.

The HubSpot Culture Code:

1. We are as maniacal about our metrics as our mission.

It’s not just about numbers. Yes, sales are important to the longevity of the company, but staying true to your mission is what will earn you the love of your customers.

2. We obsess over customers, not competitors.

Delight your customers, educate your customers, Solve for the customer (SFTC).

3. We are radically and uncomfortably transparent.

“Power came from hoarding knowledge, and decisions were made behind closed doors.” Now, power comes from sharing knowledge.

4. We give ourselves the autonomy to be awesome.

You don’t need packets full of company policies and procedures to know how to run a company. Use good judgement and remember that results matter more than where or when the work is getting done.

5. We are unreasonably picky about our peers.

Hubspot values employees who have HEART: humble, effective, adaptable, remarkable, and transparent (open and honest).

6. We invest in individual mastery and market value.

Compensate fairly while investing generously in learning and growth. Work hard as an individual and work hard as a team.

7. We defy conventional “wisdom” because it’s often unwise.

“Great companies don’t throw money at problems, they throw ideas at them”. The companies of today are much different from companies of the past. They do not operate the same way. Complexity always creeps in, so take risks and get rid of unnecessary factors.

8. We speak the truth and face the facts.

If you disagree, it is your job to speak up. An imperfect or controversial decision is better than no decision.

9. We believe in work + life, not work vs. life.

thennow

It is important to enjoy work AND life, not just working in order to make money so that you can escape to your life. Maintain a balance. Also, workers these days greatly desire flexibility when choosing a career.

10. We are a perpetual work in progress.

“Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without”- Confucius

Always work hard. Never done iterating, learning, or rethinking.

With so many happy employees facilitating a great company culture that is helping more than 8,000 companies in 56 countries to succeed, other businesses striving to achieve the same success should take note. Becoming a great company does not mean being perfect, but doing your best to make your employees and customers happy while staying aligned with your values. Also, having foosball tables and a fridge stocked with beer doesn’t hurt.

HR Roundup: What Really Matters in your HR Organization

Top Areas of Focus for HR Departments

Top Areas of Focus for HR Departments

 

Today’s HR Roundup comes from Forbes’: The 3 Things Startup Founders Need To Know About HR, a guest post from TribeHR’s Joseph Fung.

The post is directed at startups, but it has a broader benefits to established HR organizations as well. The premise is simple – there are some things you can delegate to consultants or fumble your way through in a new or growing HR organization but there are some things that are core to your corporate health and you cannot afford to overlook them.

The three main recommendations from the article for a new HR Organization are:

1) Cultural Fit -

Hiring the right people can make or break your organization. Technical prowess or tactile expertise is great, but if your new employee doesn’t subscribe to your company culture, agree with your company values and understand your company mission, they’ll never perform to their full capacity and could quickly turn into a disengaged or disconnected employee. Culture fit should be a requirement. You can teach skills, its much harder to change behavior and character.

2) Transparency -

Make sure your employees have the information they need to be autonomous, act in the right manner to benefit the company and perform with an understanding of your company and little uncertainly in your company direction. Fung goes on to say “Be deliberate in the time you choose to share information. Information shared too early may cause employees to shift priorities too soon, and information shared too late may undermine employee confidence.”.

3) Provide a “Why” -

This is a great one. Fung states most companies are good at describing the ‘what’ (product) and the ‘who’ (customers) to employees, but they don’t describe the “Why”. Why is about your larger mission, your vision, your core values as a company. Get your employees to live and breath your values and understand that everything they do revolves around a common mission of everyone at the company and you can turn your average employees into exceptional ones.

Interested in more information about building a great company culture and leading in a world of shorter tenured employees, generational differences in employee motivation and social recruiting? Subscribe to our Manager 2.0 Newsletter where we’ll send you weekly updates on employment trends and what is most talked about on the web in the HR space.