Your Questions About Employee Recognition…Answered LIVE!

Live Webcast

Thursday, December 12, 2013 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EST

Course Description:

Join other business leaders and HR professionals in this highly interactive webcast.  Our panel of recognition experts will address questions submitted from the audience…LIVE.  Get the answers you need to make employee recognition work best in your business.   Find out what questions other HR Professionals and business leaders are asking, and get answers to the most frequently asked questions organizations are facing when it comes to recognizing their employees.   

Panel of Experts Includes:

  • Mike Byam, author of The WOW! Workplace and Managing Partner
  • Bill Bergstrom, National Recognition Manager
  • Alex Allion, Western United States Recognition Director

Join these three recognition experts from Terryberry, one of the world’s foremost recognition providers, as they discuss your questions on the topic of employee recognition.

Learn the cutting edge of employee recognition that actually boosts engagement, adds value to your organization’s bottom line, and ultimately aligns your employees with your organization’s mission and goals.

Who should attend:

  • Human Resources Professionals
  • Recognition Program Administrators
  • Managers
  • Anyone who makes award presentations
This webcast is free, but space is limited, so register today!

HR Geeks: Using Losada Lines To Drive High Performing Teams

Today’s popular post of the day on LinkedIn is an uplifting story about executives at LinkedIn thanking staff and staff returning the favor by thanking ‘upward’ – back to the executives.  One point in this post stood out as its something that comes up a lot when we’re discussing employee recognition programs with clients.

What is the right balance of positive praise vs. negative feedback to give an individual in your organization?

The article referred to a mysterious term called the “Losada Ratio“.  We did some digging to find out more…

It turns out, three key researches have done extensive research into the right balance of positive praise and negative or constructive feedback in organizations.  Marcial Losada, Emily Heaphy and Barbara Fredrickson have contributed greatly to the body of research around the positivity ratio around feedback.  Losada’s research found high performing teams have a P/N (Positive to Negative) feedback score of 5.6, medium performing teams are at 1.9 and low performing teams are at 0.36.  What do these numbers mean? Losada’s study indicates that for every one piece of negative feedback that is given to individuals in high performing teams, they receive 6 pieces of positive feedback.

As Mary Poppins famously sang: A spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down.

Looking at the P/N ratios of high performing teams vs. low performing teams, you might naturally ask, is more positive feedback always better? The answer in Losada’s research is resoundingly No.   Fredrickson and Losada published an upper band of proper ratios as well. Once you get beyond a P/N ratio of 11.6, the quality of the relationship will languish, just like it can languish on the lower end of P/N ratios.  Therefore, Losada and Fredrickson state that there is a band of optimal ratios.

Keep positive-to-negative feedback ratios between 2.9 and 11.6 to allow your teams to flourish.

Too much positive praise and you reduce the impact of it; too little praise and you demotivate your employees.

It is worth noting, there is a lot of criticism around the Losada line hypothesis and way in which the research was conducted.  Key criticism implies the lower and upper levels of the range may be somewhat arbitrary and may be different for each individual.

Regardless of the exact P/N ratio that you use in managing your team for high performance, the research is directionally clear.  Make sure you delivery more positive feedback than negative feedback, and that ratio should likely be in the 3-to-1, 5-to-1 or even higher range depending on the individual that is receiving the feedback.

The Business Case For Employee Engagement

With employee engagement declining in North America, the next question to ask is the toll and cost this disturbing trend is having on business.  The bottom line, low employee engagement may be costing you $6k per employee.

Halogen Software recently shared this infographic outlining the “dollars and cents of employee engagement”.  What I really enjoyed is the excellent write-up and analysis provided by Dominique Jones of Halogen providing both context, 3rd party research and a set of solid assumptions.  Dominique is the VP of HR for Halogen and I look forward to reading more great posts from her.

In her analysis she shows how a company with 500 employees may be losing $3m dollars per year due to poor employee engagement.  That’s a lot of coin not falling to the bottom line, $6,000 per employee.

There is hope with 76% of employees showing improvements in engagement with intervention.  One of the easiest things a company can do to engage employees is to implement a peer-based recognition program.  We have seen rates of +90% voluntary employee participation in these programs that get the whole team fired up.

I highly recommend your check out Dominque’s post to understand the logic and numbers behind the picture below.

The Dollars and Sense of Employee Engagement

 

 

HR Roundup: Moving from HR Metrics to HR Analytics

Today’s HR Roundup brings a great post from the HR Examiner on a topic that is near and  dear to our hearts at MeritShare.  The importance of data to help drive decisions in your HR organization.

The post calls out the traditional HR metrics as something that is important, but really not actionable – cost per hire, time to fill, turnover, etc.  Instead, the author argues looking at your HR data set like a marketer would – segment your data down by job title, merge it with your other known data about performance information, satisfaction survey results, participation levels, etc and try to draw actionable conclusions from the metrics.  Perhaps satisfaction scores are a bit low across your entire organization on average, but only one of your managers has a below-average satisfaction score – might be time to reach out to that person as they are an anomaly within their department and may need a new challenge or professional change to reinvigorate them.

We’re excited to see the next round of technology change the way HR operates.  Google is already working on it and MeritShare is doing our part to contribute to the cause with our recognition indexes, organization and employee level metrics and snapshots into who is most and least engaged in the recognition program at your organization.

Learn more about HR Metrics vs. HR Analytics in the full post from Cathy Missildine over on HR Examiner.